Billy Graham on Aging and Regrets

Christianity Today has posted their recent interview with Billy Graham. Here is the first question and answer:

What advice would you give to people who are aging?

First, accept it as part of God’s plan for your life, and thank him every day for the gift of that day. We’ve come to look on old age as something to be dreaded—and it’s true that it isn’t easy. I can’t honestly say that I like being old—not being able to do most of the things I used to do, for example, and being more dependent on others, and facing physical challenges that I know will only get worse. Old age can be a lonely time also—children scattered, spouse and friends gone.

But God has a reason for keeping us here (even if we don’t always understand it), and we need to recover the Bible’s understanding of life and longevity as gifts from God—and therefore as something good. Several times the Bible mentions people who died “at a good old age”—an interesting phrase (emphasis added). So part of my advice is to learn to be content, and that only comes as we accept each day as a gift from God and commit it into his hands. Paul’s words are true at every stage of life, but especially as we grow older: “Godliness with contentment is great gain” (1 Tim. 6:6).

The other piece of advice I’d give is the other side of the coin, so to speak. It’s this: As we grow older we should focus not only on the present, but more and more on Heaven. This world, with all of its pains and sorrows and burdens, isn’t our final home. If we know Christ, we know we have “an inheritance that can never perish, spoil or fade—kept in heaven for you” (1 Pet. 1:4). I know it won’t be long before I’ll be going there, and I look forward to that day. Heaven gives us hope, and makes our present burdens easier to bear.

21. January 2011 by Justin Buzzard
Categories: Leadership | 1 comment

One Comment

  1. Thanks for sharing Dr. Graham’s observations on aging; they are spot on. I would add my own comment that as Paul did, we should strive to be content in whatever state we find ourselves. My inability to do what I used to do 30 years ago is more than offset by the memories I have, the decades of wisdom I have amassed, and the proximity I now have to my Savior.

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked *